Tag Archives: Students

A 2006 Interview with Steve Jobs

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While on Google Scholar I was looking for an article about the impact of the iPhone, Siri, or Apple Products. Instead I found an extract of a 1996 Wired Interview with Steve Jobs titled, “Steve Jobs: The Next Insanely Great Thing,” completed by Gary Wolf. This interview shocked me with a few of the quotes from Jobs himself and the opinion of how technology was going to have an impact. But, it is important to note that this interview was held and published before the launch of major social networking websites like MySpace, Facebook, and Twitter.

While reading this article I thought about Steve Jobs recent death in October of 2011 and how he has impact the Apple Company and the production of their products. However, while reading this article is seems that Steven Jobs did not feel that technology was going to have that much of an impact on individuals, society, and education. I beg to differ because I feel as if technology has had a huge impact on all three of those aspects.

The interview is from about 16 years ago so obvious a lot has changed. I thought some interesting points that Jobs made were about education and one of them was, “What’s wrong with education cannot be fixed with technology. No amount of technology will make a dent.” Is it possible to agree with this statement?

I am not really sure because in recent years technology has shown huge impacts and some technology involving Apple products. On the other hand I see other side of this statement where Jobs is saying no matter how much technology is in the classroom it won’t make an impact if there isn’t a good teacher in that classroom.

Overall, at the time of this interview it seems as if Jobs did not yet realize the impact technology and the company of Apple would have on the world, technology, and the Internet. Jobs is quoted as saying, “People are thinking less than they used to..So, I don’t see most people using the Web to get more information. We’re already in information overload.”

This statement I do not agree with because I don’t know a lot of people who don’t turn to the internet for information. This article was published before the laugh of social networking websites, (MySpace: August, 2003; Facebook: February, 2004; Twitter: March, 2006) where people find out more about the news and weather before turning to the News.

A final quote from Jobs that really struck me was, “Historical precedent shows that we can turn out amazing human beings without technology.” This is totally true. Individuals survived without technology and we certainly don’t realize how much we have become addicted or inept without it.

 

Sources: 2006 Interview with Steve Jobs by Gary Wolf

Is Texting Having an Impact?

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After watching Sherry Turkle’s Ted Talk video, “Connect, but alone?”  it sparked more thoughts about the intrapersonal relationships we are forming and maintaining with social networking websites, digital media and technology.

I know I shouldn’t stay up texting until 3 a.m. but I wouldn’t want to be out of the loop or miss out on this “conversation” with whomever it may be. I know I shouldn’t spend the first hour on my computer checking Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest, but I do that instead of starting my homework. If I know I shouldn’t continually do these things, then why do I always find myself trapped with the urges to check my Facebook, send in a few tweets, or scroll through the entire news feed of Pinterest.

InThe New York Times article, “Texting May Be Taking a Toll,” the author Katie Hafner mentions, “Sherry Turkle, a psychologist…has studied texting among teenagers in the Boston area for three years, said it might be causing a shift in the way adolescents develop,” (Hafner, 1). This article continued to spark my mind about intrapersonal relationships and how texting is a main factor in ruining or hindering relationships.

I thought it was interesting that throughout the article author Hafner showed how it is hard for psychologists like Turkle or Peter W. Jornson, an associate professor at the Univerysity of Washington, to really see if the effects of texting are hindering our mental, emotion, or physical health because studies are just beginning to be developed. But since it is such a phenomenon individuals can predict the true effects or impacts of texting on our society and young individuals.

It is interesting to see that some children are being resistant to their parents punishing them or holding these guidelines they have to follow about texting because their parents are indulging just as much in their own cell phones. Generations of digital natives who have grown up attached at the hip to their cell phones are shifting into parenthood. The texting obsession is not going to get better only worse if parents have trouble not indulging themselves into their iPhones.

The technology of texting is changing the intrapersonal relationships individuals have with their families and friends. We know what is right and wrong when it comes to having a conversation or interacting with others. But the fact that technology gives us more control with what we say and allows us to edit and delete is not coincidental that these are the situations we are turning toward.

Sources:

“Texting May Be Taking A Toll” – The New York Times

Everyone is Pointing Fingers At Who Should Take Charge with Cyberbullying…

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A lot of people know that cyberbullying is happening, but not a lot of people are taking it into their own hands and dealing with it. Yes, there are people who do take a stand but it has not be substantial enough were incidents are becoming fewer. If parents, schools, and professionals who work with social networking sites teamed together in campaigns against cyberbullying users would see a consistent message on how it is wrong to treat others that way.

In the article from teacherweb.com, “How Should Facebook and Myspace Handle Cyberbullying,” author Emily Bazelon describes how false accusations of cyberberbullying changed an individual’s life. The accusations began when his Facebook page was reported for harassment; however, this individual didn’t even have a Facebook page.

Furthermore, Bazelon describes how the individual and parents were never given answers on who actually created this fake Facebook. This showed me how you really can never trust who the person is behind the Facebook page because anyone can upload pictures of someone, create a profile, and be acting like someone else on the Internet.

Throughout this article Bazelon compared how MySpace and Facebook each handle cyberbullying issues. After reading the article I am sort of confused why MySpace has the rep it does because it seemed like this website takes this bullying more serious and takes greater steps into action than Facebook.

Then Facebook doesn’t seem to be actually admitting what is actually going on with cyberbullying or abusive use on the web because once it is reported they complete a small investigation and then just delete the page. It seems like Facebook is sweeping the bug under the rug and forgetting about the situation.

Instead of schools, parents, and social networking sites pointing fingers in the opposite direction I think that all three areas need to work together to control the amount of cyberbullying happening and implementing punishments. Bazelon wrote good arguments on how situations are and are not being handled; furthermore, was being realistic about the internet and today’s generation of users.

The Continued Conversation Piece, or What I Have to Say about the Future:

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After reading the SciVerse article about what speakers at the 2011 Computers and Writing Conference thought about the future, I began to think about what the future of Rowan University may be with Writing and Technology and within Writing Arts. Within the article Kristen Blair quotes from Because Digital Writing Matters (2010), saying that,

Students are doing an immense amount of writing—they’re blogging, they’re text messaging; they’re emailing, they’re updating their status messages, profile information, and live feeds on social networking and other sites; and others are “tweeting”. . . Perhaps most interesting in the midst of all this writing students are doing is that they don’t often call it “writing.” (p. 19)

As students are doing more on the Internet, classes are going to become more asynchronous through syncing on digital media devices like the iPads and computers.

Our discourse communities as students are going to be forming around the applications, programs, and the uses of our technology or digital media. Professors and college educators are realizing that technology needs to be embraced within the classroom during this generation of college students.

In the article, “iPads Could Hinder Teaching” from online journal The Chronicle, author Ben Wider says that, “Across the country, institutions had grabbed headlines for adopting Apple’s tablet computing devices,” because not only are they interactive but students are “craving” for these devices (Wieder, 1). And its true, students like my peers and myself want these products because they are the latest pieces of technology being developed and advanced yearly.

The iPad does more and more every day with software updates, the latest instant download of applications, and new models that can be used at the tip of the user’s fingers. This article really intrigued and educated me on both the pros and cons of using an iPad in the classroom. This article is slightly outdated because since it was published in 2011 there have been two new models of the iPad released; therefore, some of the cons like the “slow finger-typing” has been changed for better efficiency.

The initial con of having an iPad is the initial cost of at least five hundred dollars. Yes, the iPad costs a pretty penny. However, the long term uses and costs that can be saved will be beneficial. For example, printing expenses. As a student there are numerous classes in which we must use a lot of paper and ink for articles, drafts, and readings. With the iPad all of those documents can be accessed and referenced efficiently without the expense or time printing them. During the past school year I spent over one hundred dollars on ink, paper, and printing at the on campus library.

With an endless amount of Applications available and software updates to be downloaded the iPad can serve any purpose the users wish and change with the changes of technology.The application iAnnotate allows users to download PDFs and highlight and mark within them without printing the physical article. This is a major benefit for students who continually have to read lengthy articles for classes because they will no longer have to print these articles or keep a box of them under their bed. Instead students can have endless folders and files on their iPads.

Since I am currently saving to invest in an iPad this article has showed me the realistic uses and reality of the technology. Furthermore, reading about students and the future of writing has shown me that I don’t realize how much I actually do write on a daily basis because of the influence of technology in my life.

Sources:

Because Digital Writing Matters (2010), Dánielle DeVoss, Eideman-Aadahl, & Hicks (2010)

“IPads Could Hinder Teaching, Professors Say” (2011) The Chronicla, Ben Weider

Computers and Composition 20/20: A Conversation Piece, or What Some Very Smart People Have to Say about the Future (2011), SciVerse  ScienceDirect