Tag Archives: iPad

Maybe my Dad is more of a Digital Native then I Thought

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Last Saturday my family and I were in the car driving home from my cousin’s surprise party in Connecticut, during the about two hour car ride my Dad and I got consumed in a conversation starting with iPads and going through every opinion about Technology, digital media, email, talking about this class, and how he uses technology for work.

Surprisingly, my Dad and I were on the same page and agreed with each other on a lot. Most likely because both of us use the internet and technology a lot in our daily lives. He uses it for work as a real estate agent and I mainly use it for school and different organizations I am involved it. I honestly wish I could have recorded this conversation like an Interview to post on this blog and be able to truly show the conversation my Dad and I had because it was really intriguing to me.

First my Dad and I both want iPads. We know it will safe the amount of printing costs we both have between school and work. It is easily portable and the numerous applications available make it a great tool for a student and for a real estate agent, but mainly because of the printing expenses it would safe.

My Dad has to print up numerous contracts and legal documents daily; however, with the ability to access PDFs on the iPad and vendors now formatting iPads for the use in real estate my Dad would be able to have the contracts electronically signed and emailed to all the necessary parties. He said he spends at least one-hundred dollars a month on printing & faxing expenses. And I can believe it because this past year I spent close to one-hundred and fifty dollars on printing expenses for school between paper, ink, and printing in the on campus library.

Then the conversation turned to about email, phone calls, and texting. We talked about the appropriate time lines for people to return texts, emails, or phone calls and furthermore how some people want an instantaneous response. We agreed that texting should have an almost instant response back and that phone calls or emails should have a response within 24 hours. In today’s society I am truly surprised that there are people that do not check their email daily.

Overall, this conversation showed me that my Dad is more of a digital native and savy with technology then I thought. And it was great to see that we had a lot of common interests, uses, and opinions about technology and the way our society uses different tools. This showed me that the gap of technology knowledge or use between generations is slowly closing down because more people are using technology for work and personal reasons.

The Continued Conversation Piece, or What I Have to Say about the Future:

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After reading the SciVerse article about what speakers at the 2011 Computers and Writing Conference thought about the future, I began to think about what the future of Rowan University may be with Writing and Technology and within Writing Arts. Within the article Kristen Blair quotes from Because Digital Writing Matters (2010), saying that,

Students are doing an immense amount of writing—they’re blogging, they’re text messaging; they’re emailing, they’re updating their status messages, profile information, and live feeds on social networking and other sites; and others are “tweeting”. . . Perhaps most interesting in the midst of all this writing students are doing is that they don’t often call it “writing.” (p. 19)

As students are doing more on the Internet, classes are going to become more asynchronous through syncing on digital media devices like the iPads and computers.

Our discourse communities as students are going to be forming around the applications, programs, and the uses of our technology or digital media. Professors and college educators are realizing that technology needs to be embraced within the classroom during this generation of college students.

In the article, “iPads Could Hinder Teaching” from online journal The Chronicle, author Ben Wider says that, “Across the country, institutions had grabbed headlines for adopting Apple’s tablet computing devices,” because not only are they interactive but students are “craving” for these devices (Wieder, 1). And its true, students like my peers and myself want these products because they are the latest pieces of technology being developed and advanced yearly.

The iPad does more and more every day with software updates, the latest instant download of applications, and new models that can be used at the tip of the user’s fingers. This article really intrigued and educated me on both the pros and cons of using an iPad in the classroom. This article is slightly outdated because since it was published in 2011 there have been two new models of the iPad released; therefore, some of the cons like the “slow finger-typing” has been changed for better efficiency.

The initial con of having an iPad is the initial cost of at least five hundred dollars. Yes, the iPad costs a pretty penny. However, the long term uses and costs that can be saved will be beneficial. For example, printing expenses. As a student there are numerous classes in which we must use a lot of paper and ink for articles, drafts, and readings. With the iPad all of those documents can be accessed and referenced efficiently without the expense or time printing them. During the past school year I spent over one hundred dollars on ink, paper, and printing at the on campus library.

With an endless amount of Applications available and software updates to be downloaded the iPad can serve any purpose the users wish and change with the changes of technology.The application iAnnotate allows users to download PDFs and highlight and mark within them without printing the physical article. This is a major benefit for students who continually have to read lengthy articles for classes because they will no longer have to print these articles or keep a box of them under their bed. Instead students can have endless folders and files on their iPads.

Since I am currently saving to invest in an iPad this article has showed me the realistic uses and reality of the technology. Furthermore, reading about students and the future of writing has shown me that I don’t realize how much I actually do write on a daily basis because of the influence of technology in my life.

Sources:

Because Digital Writing Matters (2010), Dánielle DeVoss, Eideman-Aadahl, & Hicks (2010)

“IPads Could Hinder Teaching, Professors Say” (2011) The Chronicla, Ben Weider

Computers and Composition 20/20: A Conversation Piece, or What Some Very Smart People Have to Say about the Future (2011), SciVerse  ScienceDirect